Updating a values in mysql

Backticks are generally used to indicate an identifier and as well be safe from accidentally using the reserved keywords.

In combination of PHP and My SQL, double quotes and single quotes make your query writing time so much easier.

Here is my example..normal update command would be: // question ID ranges from 1-20 // $questionid == 1, $member_id==1 UPDATE table_Foo Bar SET answer One='$ans1Val', answer Two='$ans2Val', answer Three='$ans3Val' WHERE member_id='$memberid' AND question_id='$questionid'; // $questionid == 2, $member_id==1 UPDATE table_Foo Bar SET answer One='$ans1Val', answer Two='$ans2Val', answer Three='$ans3Val' WHERE member_id='$memberid' AND question_id='$questionid'; ..

UPDATE table_Foo Bar SET answer One='yes', answer Two='no', answer Three='yes' WHERE member_id = 1 AND question_id = 1; UPDATE table_Foo Bar SET answer One='no', answer Two='no', answer Three='yes' WHERE member_id = 1 AND question_id = 2; UPDATE table_Foo Bar SET answer One='yes', answer Two='yes', answer Three='no' WHERE member_id = 1 AND question_id = 3; oh, absolutely!!

Functions native to the RDBMS (for example, Backtick (`) table & column ───────┬─────┬──┬──┬──┬────┬──┬────┬──┬────┬──┬───────┐ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ $query = "INSERT INTO `table` (`id`, `col1`, `col2`, `date`, `updated`) VALUES (NULL, 'val1', 'val2', '2001-01-01', NOW())"; ↑↑↑↑ ↑ ↑ ↑ ↑ ↑ ↑ ↑↑↑↑↑ Unquoted keyword ─────┴┴┴┘ │ │ │ │ │ │ │││││ Single-quoted (') strings ───────────┴────┴──┴────┘ │ │ │││││ Single-quoted (') DATE ───────────────────────────┴──────────┘ │││││ Unquoted function ─────────────────────────────────────────┴┴┴┴┘ The quoting patterns for variables do not change, although if you intend to interpolate the variables directly in a string, it must be double-quoted in PHP.

Just make sure that you have properly escaped the variables for use in SQL.

Single quotes should be used for string values like in the list.

Double quotes are supported by My SQL for string values as well, but single quotes are more widely accepted by other RDBMS, so it is a good habit to use single quotes instead of double.

Single quotes should be used for string values like in the VALUES() list.(It is recommended to use an API supporting prepared statements instead, as protection against SQL injection).// Same thing with some variable replacements // Here, a variable table name $table is backtick-quoted, and variables // in the VALUES list are single-quoted $query = "INSERT INTO `$table` (`id`, `col1`, `col2`, `date`) VALUES (NULL, '$val1', '$val2', '$date')"; When working with prepared statements, consult the documentation to determine whether or not the statement's placeholders must be quoted. )"; @evil Reiko My SQL docs don't seem to address alias quoting clearly.your problem likely lies in the php code, something about constructing variables and looping (i'm guessing -- i don't do php so i only gave your code a cursory glance) however, since you asked this question in the mysql forum, let me give you a mysql answer redesign your table, normalize it to first normal form you have repeating columns in answer One, answer Two, answer Three these should be three rows in a normalized table from there, the php will be slightly different Hello r937! To address your normalization suggestion, here is my table structure (it goes into a tiny bit more detail; my first example was a very generalized one, this one is also generalized to a certain extent) - and there is a specific reason why I have designed it so...which I will explain in a bit.// Users Only take the survey 'foobar' once, and can // edit the answers if and only if they have not completed the survey.

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